Archives for posts with tag: art

I couldn’t resist the allure of Irish Crochet Lace for this most wonderful of Irish holidays, St. Paddy’s Day!

Paraphrased from Wikipedia, “Irish crochet” was originally developed in mid-nineteenth century Ireland as a method of imitating expensive Venetian point laces. Irish crochet lace is characterized by separately crocheted motifs, which were then assembled into a mesh background.

This lace is made with a very fine steel crochet hook and fine crochet cotton or linen thread. It begins with an outline of the pattern on a piece of cloth. Each motif is then crocheted separately, using cotton cord for volume and shaping. The finished motifs are then basted (sewn with a loose stitch for temporary tacking) onto a cloth in the shape of the pattern. The motifs are then joined using chains and picots. When all the motifs have been joined together forming one piece of lace the basting stitch is removed from the back cloth revealing the completed lace.

I’ve gathered the following examples of Irish lace from Pinterest, all coming from Russian sites. However, I did find a wonderful Facebook group called Irish Crochet Lab that is run by Larisa Chilton, who is an instructor and has developed an online course for those who want to learn Traditional and Modern Irish crochet lace. You can find Ms. Chilton’s site at https://www.facebook.com/videotutorialsandpatterns/ . Enjoy!

Irish Crochet 2

From postila.ru

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irish crochet 3

From postila.ru, a type of Pinterest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irish crochet 6

https://www.livemaster.ru/item/17305403-odezhda-vintazhnyj-kaftan-suvenir

Irish crochet 5

http://www.facebook.com/Asia-Verte

Irish crochet 7

http://www.facebook.com/Asia-Verten

Oh, yes, just one more thing. Today is my brother-in-law’s birthday – Happy Birthday, Craig!

turkish-cuff

Posted from Pinterest, designed by Turkish artist Sebahat at https://www.etsy.com/shop/irregularexpressions 

Sometime in the fall of last year I was rambling through crochet pages on Pinterest and happened upon “cuffs” (aka “cuff bracelets”, “Turkish cuffs”, or boho/shabby chic bracelets), seemingly a combination of bracelet and an elaborate cuff. Of course, I was completely enthralled and searched for more.

 ez-cuff        cuff
cuff3        cufff
cuff4      cuff5
I have fallen completely in love with this style and it is definitely on my agenda for this year to create one of my own. However, at the rate I’m going, this year may need to stretch out to about 16 months. Anyway, all the photos were taken from Pinterest, and the crochet artist and shop are as follows, top to bottom –
Wedding Jewelry by Emelie at https://www.etsy.com/shop/Emeliebeads
Beaded Bracelet by Stanislava at https://www.etsy.com/shop/stasiSpark
Crochet Cuff Bracelet by Kremena at https://www.etsy.com/shop/KSZCrochetTreasures
Flower Crochet Bracelet by Stanislava at https://www.etsy.com/shop/stasiSpark

Yarn-bombing-Yarnbombing-Storming-Guerrilla-Knitting-Kniffiti-Urban-Graffiti-tricot-graffiti-urbain-09

Yarn Bombing, known as Guerilla Crochet/Knitting among other names, will take over the world. June 11th (as well as being my younger son’s and his cousin’s birthday) has been designated International Yarnbombing Day. The start of this movement has been attributed to Magda Sayeg, 37, from Houston, who says she first got the idea in 2005 when she covered the door handle of her boutique with a custom made cozy. I’m sure she had no idea what she was starting!

Some don’t like this event, saying it’s a waste of yarn; some love it and say it brings fiber art to the masses. Personally, I just think it’s fun!

606f5692e78bcfc275bcae24c7d39e5d       b326e8672b2a9a2444623c8fa2507362     26887de94a05c7b9ea81977ffb6d011f

3a1ad1b1ab4629759cd7feacc410e3b6     2782b48cda9d93ee9ecca1e608135c85

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All photos are from Pinterest, Yarn Bombing

 

Since spring is here and many flowers have shaken off their winter inertia, I thought I should come up with a seasonally appropriate post. Plus, I just recently joined Crochet.Community (an online group) and they hold quarterly competitions where the winner is awarded $50 and a t-shirt. This current competition is, of course, flower themed. The only really good flower I’ve made I gave to my mom, and didn’t take a photo of it beforehand. So instead I entered a very elegant (if I do say so myself!) Poinsettia Potholder. Not the spring flowers the CC had in mind, I’m sure, but it didn’t get kicked out either. So we’ll have to see. Results will be in on May 1st – just in time for my next post.

Earlier today I was perusing Pinterest and came across some of the most gorgeous crocheted flowers. BTW, as a general rule I don’t like crocheted flowers – too kitschy for me I guess – but these are definitely the exception. Enjoy!

Carnation

Happy Patty Crochet offers exquisite floral patterns and products at https://www.etsy.com/shop/HappyPattyCrochet (I just love carnations!)

work_08_03 www.jungjung.jp

Japanese fibre artiste JungJung at http://www.jungjung.jp Museum quality work!

 

Rose, master class a

I loved this flower so much I wanted to show you two versions!

golden flower, e7b75d58637c9cce14dd94e1c199dd07

Posted from postila.ru from sheru.ru Wonderful Irish crochet and more

 

 

 

 

 

Irish Lace, 2269a5453b5572bbbeb3b19b845e6b3e - Copy (2)

Posted by postila.ru on Pinterest, originally from cmpana mam

Irish Lace, 2269a5453b5572bbbeb3b19b845e6b3e - Copy

Duitang.com 3-D flower

Reposted from http://www.duitang.com/blog; photo states https://dikulya67.ru/ Love this little flower! Definitely could see this on the bottom edge of a scarf with pearl centers.

IMG_0410A

And lastly, my Poinsettia Potholder. Keep your fingers crossed I win!

I know this has nothing to do with crochet, but lacy things just attract me like a moth to a flame and I wanted to share. I came across some examples of intricately cut paper (what I call paper lace) and have fallen in love. What they are able to accomplish is just totally amazing! Of course, I wouldn’t want to think about the time involvement, but then again, designing, crocheting, and writing down a pattern isn’t exactly expeditious, either. The wonderful thing about this art is that some of the artists even sell templates that you can cut out yourself. Oh, I must stop running across other crafts that I would love to try my hand at because I seriously doubt I’m going to live to be 200!

Hina Aoyama.    La Fee 2549381380_9d6d93e757_z

Detail of work by Hino Aoyama. See more at https://www.flickr.com/photos/37051688@N00/

Sawing Waves, Rice paper on silk, 2012, photo by Bovey Lee

Sawing Waves, 2012, photo by Bovey Lee on Artsy, copied from Pinterest

Bunny papercut

 

Circle Papercuts-by-Suzy-Taylor__880

Two works by Suzy Taylor, Folk Art Papercuts at https://www.etsy.com/shop/FolkArtPapercuts

Ah, come on, you knew I had to get a butterfly in here somehow!

Once again it is Valentine’s Day – a wonderful reminder to let our loved ones know how special they are to us. So for today, since I can’t send all of you mountains of chocolate, I will offer you the following crocheted eye candies – all with zero calories!

3-D Flowered HeartA

Lunarheavenly, an Asian crochet artist, found at https://twitter.com/Lunar_h

Grandma's Heart

Grandmother’s heart from belladia.typepad.com

Flowered HeartA

Victorian charm from solocrochet-manualista.blogspot.com.ar

Lace  Heart

A modern twist by gibritte2.blogspot.com.br

Ruffled Heart

Heart Pillow by Shellie Wilson of CraftBits.com

Irish crochet heart

Irish Crochet Heart Ornament by Annie Potter; Photo by Nik_OC on Flickr

Sweet Hearts

Little lovelies by midnightpoem.tumblr.com

Flowered Heart by LH

Another beauty by https://twitter.com/Lunar_h

From Party City - Animal Planet Dog Costume

From Party City – Animal Planet Dog Costume

Well, you just had to know I would pick a Monarch butterfly costume! But this picture just knocks me out – the mixing of the big bruiser bulldog with the delicate wings is brilliant, and the look on the dog’s face is priceless. Personally, I think he likes it!

I have been wandering the internet finding many costumes for pets, so I would like to share some of the wonderful crocheted costumes I’ve found. I saved the photos somewhere on this computer. Now I can’t find them. And I thought I was organized – Huh! Anyway, I will share what I could find, even if some of them are not crocheted. If this world is big enough for the knitters as well as crocheters, I guess we can fit in the seamstresses, too. Why not?

It's not easy being green!

It’s not easy being green!

Halloween Kitty from SPCA Florida

Halloween Kitty from SPCA Florida

Hamster Witch

Hamster Witch

Kitty Bat

Bat Kitty from EarthPorn

Cat in the Shark Hat from Pinterest

Cat in the Shark Hat from Pinterest

Mmm, I think your hamburger is getting away...

Mmm, I think your hamburger is getting away…

James Bond Kitty at Catster.com

James Bond Kitty at Catster.com

Goose Ladies

Goose Ladies

Etsy's OnceUponAPoodle sells crochet patterns for dogs

Etsy’s OnceUponAPoodle sells crochet patterns for dogs

'Pigeons in Costume' by Laurel Roth Features Some Warm Furry Flyers

‘Pigeons in Costume’ by Laurel Roth Features Some Warm Furry Flyers

“Ianuaria” by Caitlin T. McCormack

Since it is the season for all things shuddersome, I thought I would share the fantastical work of Caitlin T. McCormack with you. She creates beautiful, lace-like “skeletons” out of cotton crochet thread and PVC glue, mounting them to dark backgrounds to maximize their effect. In her own words –

“The act of stiffening intricately crocheted cotton string with glue produces material that is structurally similar to delicate bone tissue. The string implemented in this process can be viewed as the basic cellular unit of fabrication, and by utilizing media and practices inherited from my deceased relatives, I aim to generate emblems of my diminishing bloodline, embodied by each organism’s skeletal remains.”

Oh, yes. Most definitely creepy! McCormack began this type of work after her grandparents passed away within months of each other in 2010/11. Originally studying illustration, she returned to the crocheting taught to her by her grandmother to deal with her grief. Of course, we are now aware of how emotionally healing crocheting and knitting can be (see http://www.crochetconcupiscence.com/ for more information).

To create each piece, which can take anywhere from two days to several weeks, McCormack focuses on a specific memory of her own, and begins to crochet a skeleton without reference. As a medium, crochet “accelerates the process of forgetting” with its physical “twisting and warping,” she said. The final products aren’t supposed to be replicas, but are more like metaphors for the artist’s memories.

"The Organist" by Caitlin T. McCormack

“The Organist” by Caitlin T. McCormack

To view more of McCormack’s work, you can go to http://caitlintmccormack.com/section/323579-Sculpture.html, http://beautifuldecay.com/2015/07/16/the-crocheted-apocryphal-animal-skeletons-of-caitlin-t-mccormack/, and http://www.bleaq.com/2014/caitlin-t-mccormack. Enjoy!

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